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Person: BAMFORTH, James  (1842-1911)

Biographical summary of this person
Full name
James BAMFORTH
Gender
male
Relevance of this person
owner/proprietor of slide manufacturing business
Main period of activity
1880s-1900s
Relationships to other people

son of BAMFORTH, Joseph  (1819-1899)

married to BAMFORTH, Mrs Martha  (1843-1894)

adoptive parent of GREENSMITH, Miss Sarah  (1866-1934)

father of BAMFORTH, Harry  (1867-1930)

father of BAMFORTH, Walter  (1869- ? )

father of BAMFORTH, Fred  (1871- ? )

father of BAMFORTH, Frank  (1872-1947)

father of BAMFORTH, Lizzie  (1875-1956)

father of BAMFORTH, Edwin  (1877-1939)

father of BAMFORTH, Jane  (1878-1963)

Chronology
Date
Age
Event/activity
1870-1900s
~28
owner
1900s
~57
owner
2 April 1911
~69
census record
1911 Census of England and Wales, RG14/26224
– occupation “Photographer, Maker Of Lantern Slides & Picture Post Cards”
Slide sets linked to this person

model: For mother's sake: a story of the demon drink (service of song: Bamforth & Co., 40 slides, 1891)

model: For the master's sake (service of song: Bamforth & Co., 38 slides, 1893)

model: Found at last: sequel to 'Lost in London' (service of song: Bamforth & Co., 17-24 slides, 1895)

model: Grizzie and Jim: a temperance service of song (service of song: Bamforth & Co., 31 slides, 1892)

model: Hard as a nail: or, Jubal Sparge's bounty (story: Bamforth & Co., 42 slides, 1897)

model: Harry's pint: or, threepence a day (story: Bamforth & Co., 20 slides, 1898)

model: Jack the conqueror (story: Bamforth & Co., 25-26 slides, 1880s)

model: Ora pro nobis (song: Bamforth & Co., 8 slides, 1897)

model: The road to Heaven (recitation: Bamforth & Co., 7-9 slides, 1891)

model: The toilers (song: Bamforth & Co., 14 slides, 1897)

model: The way to Heaven (service of song: Bamforth & Co., 38 slides, 1892)

Slides showing image of this person
slide image -- 'Do you hear me?' said her father, 'stop crying, at once'slide image -- 'Do you hear me?' said her father, 'stop crying, at once'slide image -- 'Glad to see you so much better, madam'slide image -- 'I'm not going to lose a pretty child, like her, from the stage'slide image -- Her father lifted her from the bedslide image -- She often found her father in close conversation with the ladyslide image -- 'Rosalie,' said her stepmother, 'I intend that you shall make yourself useful'slide image -- It was a child -- a little girlslide image -- It was a child -- a little girlslide image -- And every means the good wife usedslide image -- And every means the good wife usedslide image -- 'God bless you all, and keep you His'slide image -- 'God bless you all, and keep you His'slide image -- The old man gave the bride awayslide image -- The old man gave the bride awayslide image -- 'Ah! Nelly, you've come to see poor father die'slide image -- 'Ah! Nelly, you've come to see poor father die'slide image -- And the hand of death had broken the chain of his grief and painslide image -- And the hand of death had broken the chain of his grief and painslide image -- 'Take that and die,' said Nedslide image -- 'Take that and die,' said Nedslide image -- He saw him off to prison goslide image -- He saw him off to prison goslide image -- The moonlight glanced upon a millslide image -- The moonlight glanced upon a millslide image -- He sat him down upon a bankslide image -- He sat him down upon a bankslide image -- Be merciful to me, O Godslide image -- Be merciful to me, O Godslide image -- Homeward, he turned -- he thought of Janeslide image -- Homeward, he turned -- he thought of Janeslide image -- Dear William! love me once againslide image -- Dear William! love me once againslide image -- Oh, when was Sabbath eve like this?slide image -- Oh, when was Sabbath eve like this?slide image -- Oh, Edward! do not laugh, I prayslide image -- Come, you Old Witch, what are you chattering there forslide image -- The Gipsies leaving the Caveslide image -- Bertram carried him on his shoulders, blindfoldedslide image -- Eric stood quietly while they tied their rope around himslide image -- Oh, if the rope should break, thought the poor childslide image -- Bertram seized the poor Boy and dragged him awayslide image -- Eric told all that had happenedslide image -- Albert threw himself at the feet of Bertramslide image -- Black Bertram stealing away the Young Countslide image -- We have them now, cried Bertramslide image -- The Count stood a long time gazing at the childslide image -- The Old Gipsy Woman entered the chamberslide image -- She handed the Count a Small Bundleslide image -- The Count and Countess were Sitting together on the Terraceslide image -- 'Why, here, right before your eyes,' the officer repliedslide image -- Suddenly he staggered towards a seat by the wallslide image -- She swung herself round on the music-stool, and said, etc.slide image -- Then came the snow, and wintry winds swept bare the poplar treeslide image -- Young Davie Blake sailed out, he knew not whereslide image -- And yesternight I heard him pray, as though he meant, &c.slide image -- The only attentions he received from them were cuffs and blowsslide image -- The only attentions he received from them were cuffs and blowsslide image -- Stumps paid a visit to an old clothes shopslide image -- She looked up at the kindly faceslide image -- The mistress with a smiling faceslide image -- The mistress with a smiling faceslide image -- Then high she raised her in the airslide image -- Then high she raised her in the airslide image -- On, on, he strode with rapid stepslide image -- On, on, he strode with rapid stepslide image -- A crowd of people filled the placeslide image -- A crowd of people filled the placeslide image -- The touch of its small icy feetslide image -- The touch of its small icy feetslide image -- My child, thank God, is rosy nowslide image -- My child, thank God, is rosy nowslide image -- Horrible dens, sir, aren't they? / This is one of my daily roundsslide image -- Horrible dens, sir, aren't they? / This is one of my daily roundsslide image -- She was one of a group of fairies, / And her wand was the wand up there --slide image -- She was one of a group of fairies, / And her wand was the wand up there --slide image -- And in the evening, when at home, she said the text and sung the hymnslide image -- Beside the fire the old folks sat, but not a word had they to sayslide image -- The tidings that his child was gone soon reached the home of Thomas Leeslide image -- But he was stricken to the heart and lifted up his head no moreslide image -- But ere he went he called his wife, and took her hand between his ownslide image -- It is Christmas Day in the Workhouse, and the cold bare walls are brightslide image -- It is Christmas Day in the Workhouse, and the cold bare walls are brightslide image -- It is Christmas Day in the Workhouse, and the cold bare walls are brightslide image -- 'Great God!' he cries; 'but it chokes me! for this is the day she died'slide image -- 'Great God!' he cries; 'but it chokes me! for this is the day she died'slide image -- 'Great God!' he cries; 'but it chokes me! for this is the day she died'slide image -- He looked at the guardians' ladies, then, eyeing their lords, he said:slide image -- He looked at the guardians' ladies, then, eyeing their lords, he said:slide image -- He looked at the guardians' ladies, then, eyeing their lords, he said:slide image -- 'Keep your hands off me, curse you! hear me right out ot the end'slide image -- 'Keep your hands off me, curse you! hear me right out ot the end'slide image -- 'Keep your hands off me, curse you! hear me right out ot the end'slide image -- 'I came to the parish, craving bread for a starving wife'slide image -- 'I came to the parish, craving bread for a starving wife'slide image -- 'I came to the parish, craving bread for a starving wife'slide image -- 'I slunk to the filthy alley -- 'twas a cold, raw Christmas eve'slide image -- 'I slunk to the filthy alley -- 'twas a cold, raw Christmas eve'slide image -- 'All through that eve I watched her, holding her hand in mine'slide image -- 'All through that eve I watched her, holding her hand in mine'slide image -- 'All through that eve I watched her, holding her hand in mine'slide image -- 'I rushed from the room like a madman, and flew to the workhouse gate'slide image -- 'I rushed from the room like a madman, and flew to the workhouse gate'slide image -- 'I rushed from the room like a madman, and flew to the workhouse gate'slide image -- 'For there in the silv'ry moonlight my Nance lay, cold and still'slide image -- 'For there in the silv'ry moonlight my Nance lay, cold and still'slide image -- 'For there in the silv'ry moonlight my Nance lay, cold and still'slide image -- 'For there in the silv'ry moonlight my Nance lay, cold and still'slide image -- 'You, who would feast us paupers, what of my murdered wife?'slide image -- 'You, who would feast us paupers, what of my murdered wife?'slide image -- 'You, who would feast us paupers, what of my murdered wife?'slide image -- My boat's that there in the harbour, and the man aboard's my mateslide image -- My boat's that there in the harbour, and the man aboard's my mateslide image -- Her as our boat's named arter was famous far and wideslide image -- Her as our boat's named arter was famous far and wideslide image -- But one week wed and they parted -- he went with the fisher fleetslide image -- But one week wed and they parted -- he went with the fisher fleetslide image -- The boat was out in the tempest -- and she was in it aloneslide image -- The boat was out in the tempest -- and she was in it aloneslide image -- We carried him to a cottage, and we laid him on a bedslide image -- We carried him to a cottage, and we laid him on a bedslide image -- That night with her arms around him, the poor mad woman diedslide image -- That night with her arms around him, the poor mad woman diedslide image -- And the doctor who saw it told him if he didn't rest he'd be lamedslide image -- But we hadn't sat down a second when a beadle came up like madslide image -- 'Sir,' said Jamie, 'is it here that my father gets drunk?'slide image -- 'Kitty hasn't had any dinner or supper,' and he put his arm around the sobbing childslide image -- Old Tiger took Kitty in his arms, and led Jamie from the storeslide image -- 'Only a penny a box,' he said; but the gentleman turned away his headslide image -- 'One penny and then I can buy the bread,' the gentleman stopped, 'And you?' he saidslide image -- 'One penny and then I can buy the bread,' the gentleman stopped, 'And you?' he saidslide image -- 'Oh, sir, if you'll only take the pack, I'll bring you the change in a moment back'slide image -- 'The gentleman lolled in his easy chair, and watched his cigar-smoke melt in the airslide image -- 'Kiss me; good night: and each be sure, when you're saying your prayers, remember the poor'slide image -- Half breathless, bewildered, and ragged, and strange, 'I'm Ruby, Mike's brother -- I've brought you the change'slide image -- When the garret they hastily entered, they saw two arms, mangled, shapeless, outstretched on the strawslide image -- Within they drank and screamed for more -- it was an awful sightslide image -- Drunkards go staggering through the town, roaring some ribald songslide image -- One day a stranger came into the garretslide image -- He staggers -- he's beat -- knock him down -- bravo! lad,slide image -- He staggers -- he's beat -- knock him down -- bravo! lad,slide image -- He's down in the mud -- how they clutch at his ragsslide image -- 'Let me go, in God's name! Let me go, if you're men'slide image -- 'I've a wife at death's door lying hungry and cold'slide image -- 'Oh, don't hurt my wrists, I'll go -- yes, I'll go'slide image -- 'I want you to go see a poor gipsy man'slide image -- (Effect) While many a homeless wanderer uplifted patient eyesslide image -- A moment pause -- Behold that man, he was of gentle birthslide image -- When thou wast wed to me, my lass, a trustful bonnie brideslide image -- The minister was standing beside the cot of Wee Davieslide image -- The minister was standing beside the cot of Wee Davieslide image -- He heard with patience and attention all that Jeanie saidslide image -- He heard with patience and attention all that Jeanie saidslide image -- William and Jeanie listened attentively to the ministerslide image -- William and Jeanie listened attentively to the ministerslide image -- Pointing to the child, he said, 'God never leaves himself without a witness'slide image -- Pointing to the child, he said, 'God never leaves himself without a witness'slide image -- He poured forth a simple, loving, and sympathising prayerslide image -- He poured forth a simple, loving, and sympathising prayerslide image -- His very silence was eloquent affectionslide image -- His very silence was eloquent affectionslide image -- 'Depend upon it, every true prayer is heard and answered by Him,' he repliedslide image -- 'Depend upon it, every true prayer is heard and answered by Him,' he repliedslide image -- They sat together in deep silenceslide image -- They sat together in deep silenceslide image -- All assembled knelt while the minister offered prayerslide image -- All assembled knelt while the minister offered prayerslide image -- On such a night the sea engulphed my father's lifeless formslide image -- And saw the grave wherein it layslide image -- They found the landlord at his houseslide image -- Been out in the lifeboat often? Ay, ay, sir, often enoughslide image -- Yon be the rock she struck on --slide image -- He hears his daughter's voice, singing in the village choirslide image -- He hears his daughter's voice, singing in the village choirslide image -- Thank God! here is my ain gude manslide image -- The husband laughed and took his hatslide image -- With rapid steps, he reached full soonslide image -- And darkness fell on baffled hopesslide image -- The father watched them as they layslide image -- Wee Frankie's blue and parched lipsslide image -- Thanks God! here are my ain dear bairnsslide image -- 'Tis the fool's pence that does it for us,' she saidslide image -- 'Well, sir, and what's for you?'slide image -- 'Well, Bessy and Sally, are you not glad to see me?slide image -- He came up to his father, looked full in his face, and said, &c.slide image -- 'There are my week's wages, dear mother'slide image -- 'Why, my good man, we are old friends'slide image -- 'What can I render unto the Lord for all His goodness to me?'slide image -- He went with unsteady steps to the bedsideslide image -- He went with unsteady steps to the bedsideslide image -- For days Brian sat in heavy, silent griefslide image -- For days Brian sat in heavy, silent griefslide image -- Once more they had their tidy roomsslide image -- Well, good-bye, old fellow; mind you drop us a line when you arriveslide image -- Ruth sank down on a chair and burst into a flood of tearsslide image -- There, come back, Ben, and let us have a cup of teaslide image -- Ruth took the letter and kissed it again and againslide image -- He read on slowly for some time, Ruth listening with rapt attentionslide image -- He flung his head down upon his arms and groaned aloudslide image -- 'Ben, he never did it!' said Ruth in a calm, distinct voiceslide image -- 'Oh, sir,' cried Ruth, as she set a chair, 'Ben's in great trouble'slide image -- 'And now, sir, if I may make so bold, how -- has he written to you?'slide image -- 'Well, my good friend, let me hear first what your account of the matter is'slide image -- 'The letter, I find, is from Capt. Macintosh's coachman,' said the ministerslide image -- 'Your son is acquitted!' was the clergyman's simple greetingslide image -- The door opened and in marched the motley crewslide image -- The door opened and in marched the motley crewslide image -- The King sat at the head of the tableslide image -- The King sat at the head of the tableslide image -- The figure glided noiselessly towards the tableslide image -- The figure glided noiselessly towards the tableslide image -- He finds a seat in a back row in the galleryslide image -- He continued to sit with eyes closedslide image -- The landlord of the hotel rebuked himslide image -- They stood around the coffin and sang a hymnslide image -- 'I must put you off at the next station then!' but stopped when he heard the boy sayslide image -- 'I'm obliged to you, Miss, for your kindness to me'slide image -- The Redcross Street Mission Hall was the one oasis in the desertslide image -- Jack came exactly into the foreground of the pictureslide image -- 'He has got out of your reach, my lad,' said the artist to himselfslide image -- He suddenly dropped on it his tattered straw hatslide image -- 'What is your name, lad?' asked the artistslide image -- The artist thought of Jack as he was finishing the pictureslide image -- She looked up at the kindly face
Slide set references

image appears in: Almost wrecked (recitation: Bamforth & Co., 32 slides, 1889)

image appears in: The ballad singer (recitation: Bamforth & Co., 6 slides, 1883-1888)

image appears in: Beware!: or, the effects of gambling (story: Bamforth & Co., 24 slides, 1893)

image appears in: Catterina: a pathetic story (story: Bamforth & Co., 49 slides, 1893)

image appears in: The drunkard's wife (recitation: Bamforth & Co., 6 slides, 1880s)

image appears in: The drunkards (recitation: Bamforth & Co., 12 slides, 1880s)

image appears in: The fool's pence (recitation: Bamforth & Co., 8 slides, 1880s)

image appears in: The gipsy's revenge (story: Bamforth & Co., 34 slides, 1886)

image appears in: Her Benny (story: Bamforth & Co., 42 slides, 1889)

image appears in: The idol of Britain (recitation: Bamforth & Co., 7 slides, 1899)

image appears in: In the harbour (recitation: Bamforth & Co., 9 slides, 1890)

image appears in: In the workhouse (recitation: Bamforth & Co., 9 slides, 1890)

image appears in: Jack the conqueror: new series (story: Bamforth & Co., 41 slides, 1893)

image appears in: Keeping his word (recitation: Bamforth & Co., 9 slides, 1892)

image appears in: The lifeboat (recitation: Bamforth & Co., 20 slides, 1899)

image appears in: Little Jamie (service of song: Bamforth & Co., 37 slides, 1891)

image appears in: The little shoes (recitation: Bamforth & Co., 6 slides, 1880s)

image appears in: The lost child (recitation: Bamforth & Co., 32 slides, 1890)

image appears in: The magic wand (recitation: Bamforth & Co., 6 slides, 1889)

image appears in: The Mallee scrub: a true story of three children who were lost in the Australian bush (recitation: Bamforth & Co., 24 slides, 1887)

image appears in: A man hunt (recitation: Bamforth & Co., 8 slides, 1893)

image appears in: Matt Stubbs' dream: or, Christmas Eve at the Blue Boar (story: Bamforth & Co., 40 slides, 1897)

image appears in: Mother's last words (recitation: Bamforth & Co., 19 slides, 1880s)

image appears in: Nelly's champion (story: Bamforth & Co., 17 slides, 1889)

image appears in: Our Father's care (recitation: Bamforth & Co., 14 slides, 1880s)

image appears in: Paying the fare: a true story (service of song: Bamforth & Co., 48 slides, 1901)

image appears in: A peep behind the scenes (story: Bamforth & Co., 36 slides, 1880s)

image appears in: The pilot (song: Bamforth & Co., 7 slides, 1904)

image appears in: Please, Mr Conductor, don't put me off (song: Bamforth & Co., 22 slides, 1903)

image appears in: The quarryman's resolve (recitation: Bamforth & Co., 12 slides, 1900)

image appears in: Rhoda: or, the gipsy girl's mission of love (service of song: Bamforth & Co., 40-46 slides, 1894)

image appears in: Riches and rags (service of song: Bamforth & Co., 50 slides, 1907)

image appears in: Saved from the sea (recitation: Bamforth & Co., 10 slides, 1880s)

image appears in: The star of Bethlehem (song: Bamforth & Co., 9 slides, 1895)

image appears in: The street tumblers (recitation: Bamforth & Co., 10 slides, 1890)

image appears in: Stumps: a sequel to Nelly's champion (story: Bamforth & Co., 21 slides, 1889)

image appears in: There's help at hand (recitation: Bamforth & Co., 28 slides, 1880s)

image appears in: There's help at hand (service of song: Bamforth & Co., 28 slides, 1896)

image appears in: The village blacksmith (recitation: Bamforth & Co., 12 slides, 1891)

image appears in: Wee Davie (service of song: Bamforth & Co., 42 slides, 1899)

image appears in: While the Sabbath bells were ringing (recitation: Bamforth & Co., 7 slides, 1892)

References
David Robinson, Stephen Herbert and Richard Crangle (editors), Encyclopaedia of the magic lantern (London: Magic Lantern Society, 2001), p. 26
‘A brief history of Bamforth & Co. Ltd.’ in NMLJ 1.1 (April 1978), p. 12
Robert McMillan, ‘James Bamforth’ in NMLJ 1.2 (February 1979), pp. 12-15
‘Piracy of copyright lantern slides’ in OMLJ 12.144 (May 1901)
  –  bringing lawsuit for copyright infringement
Philip Reynolds, ‘Sentiment to order’ in Harmsworth Magazine
Notes
Occupations:
1861 (surname 'Balmforth') Painter, like his father
1867-69 Painter (at baptism of his sons Harry and Walter)
1871 Photographer
1881 (surname 'Balmforth') Photographer & Painter
1891 Photographer & maker of lantern slides
1901 Magic Lantern Slide Maker
Lucerna ID  6002231

Record created by Richard Crangle. Last updated 21 April 2014

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